God’s Good Earth update

Well, I’m told that the author-copies of the new book are winging their way across the Atlantic from the publisher to me, which means that it should be published within the next few weeks. Thanks for being so patient.I intend to put up a dedicated website in due course, with useful things like an online bibliography, links to follow-up blogs, a promo video and so on. But before that happens I have put up a picture of the book’s cover, so you know what to look out for in the bargain-basket of your supermarket.

Do have a look, as a bit of traffic may encourage Google to get their bots on the job, which is always good for traffic. The url is www.godsgoodearth.org.

Jon Garvey

About Jon Garvey

Training in medicine (which was my career), social psychology and theology. Interests in most things, but especially the science-faith interface. The rest of my time, though, is spent writing, playing and recording music.
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11 Responses to God’s Good Earth update

  1. Noah White says:

    Incredibly happy for you, Jon. This is so exciting!

    Very sad for my friends and family, however, as they will be having copies of this book relentlessly thrown at them for the foreseeable future!

    • Jon Garvey Jon Garvey says:

      Thanks Noah, though I hope I don’t become the cause of family arguments!

      Today’s news from the publisher is that availability should come around as follows:
      http://www.wipfandstock.com: in 2 weeks
      Amazon: in 2-4 weeks
      Ingram: in 4 weeks
      Kindle: in 2-4 weeks

      If you (or other Hump folk) do read it, please consider doing a review on Amazon.

  2. Jon Garvey Jon Garvey says:

    For US readers (and those willing to pay international postage) the book is now available online from the publisher. Link available from godsgoodearth.org.

    The publisher tells me they’re setting up a secondary printing facility in UK in the next few weeks. And availability from Amazon etc should appear shortly.

  3. Paul Bruggink says:

    The sports analogy at the bottom of p. xix might have worked better if you had used hockey, which has three periods to a game. 🙂

    • Jon Garvey Jon Garvey says:

      Paul – thanks for purchase! Glad you enjoyed the Introduction. I’ll have to incorporate the Trinitarian game of three halves for the 2nd edition, especially since my son runs a hockey team!

  4. Paul Bruggink says:

    p.s. I’m looking forward to reading the rest of the book. I’m now all the way up to p. 3.

  5. Paul Bruggink says:

    Thank you for pointing me to your “Online Bibliography” (and your “Online Further Reading”).

    BTW, hockey has three periods, not three halves.

    And for your list of changes for the second edition, Keith Miller was the editor, not the author (middle of p. xvii) of “Perspectives on an Evolving Creation,” although he did author or co-author three of the essays in that outstanding book.

    • Jon Garvey Jon Garvey says:

      BTW, hockey has three periods, not three halves.

      Yes – I knew that, but I though it would be fun to replace an incomplete analogy with a mathematical impossibility!

      A shame to find a slip of the pen on page xvii, though – I’m pretty sure that was a last minute edit just to say who Keith was. Should have left the readers to find out!

    • Jon Garvey Jon Garvey says:

      Paul’s is my first Anazon review! Thanks Paul. You didn’t even mark it down for lack of references to hockey!

      A good review, too, by the way.

  6. Jon Garvey Jon Garvey says:

    Well, today (through the snow) my authors’ copies of God’s Good Earth finally arrived from across the Atlantic. Very pretty they look, too – just like a real book.

    I guess I can add at this time that Cascade have accepted my book on the Genealogical Adam paradigm, which should supplement the one by Joshua Swamidass scheduled to come out towards the end of the year, and another by Andrew Loke.

    Mine is along the lines of a number of pieces here at the Hump – seeking to show that if Genealogical Adam is true, it is far more than an “accommodationist theory,” because it makes it likely that the biblical writers assumed Adam was not the sole original human being, and that the biblical metanarrative is affected, and clarified, to a significant extent by that assumption.So The Generations of heaven and Earth (working title) is really about biblical theology.

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