Monthly Archives: August 2019

The propaganda society

In the final years of the Soviet Union, as I’ve mentioned before I think, everybody in the Russian Empire knew that half of what they read in the ironically-titled Pravda (Truth) was nothing but lies. The problem for truth was that they had litle way of knowing which half was false. The trouble for national morale has been well observered by British ex-psychiatrist Theodore Dalrymple:

Posted in Politics and sociology | Leave a comment

Those magnificent beasts in their flying machines

Pretty rough weather here over the weekend. 40mph winds the night before last, together with torrential rain, all strong enough to break a thick branch on the oak tree immediately over our glass-house. Providentially, the two pieces sagged either side of the edifice, sparing all the glass.It also ended up resting on, but not breaking, our rotary clothes line, and sparing the hammock. It must have been that which woke me up thinking somebody was up early banging toys around. I’ll have to get the tree surgeons over to sort it out permanently, rather than clambering out along the bough with a handsaw myself and, no doubt, falling through the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Listen to the NGOs (and documentary makers), not the scientists!

For listening to the politicians, see here. I’ve had an interest in “documentary fiction” for some years, and the subject even found its way into my book God’s Good Earth, primarily from the angle of “Nature porn” portraying God’s world anthropomorphically as a tragic drama. Unfortunately David Attenborough features heavily in my critique, firstly because he does it a lot, secondly because he is hugely influential through the technical quality of his stuff, and thirdly because as a degreed zoologist he ought to do better.

Posted in Creation, Politics and sociology, Science | Leave a comment

Forgetful history

A correspondent with whom I’ve been discussing the Genesis Flood mentioned the interesting case of the Umm al Binni Lake in Iraq, which appears to be a recent meteoric impact crater, dated on the basis of the sedimentary history of the region to historic times. This would mean between 3000 and 2000 BCE, and it possibly corresponds to evidence in the region of widespread wildfires and floods from a likely airburst c2350BCE, called the Middle East Anomaly.

Posted in History, Science, Theology | 2 Comments

Whacko!

Well, that was a thrill! I’ve just come back from walking the dog through the wood, and witnessed a bit of nature drama. So you may as well share it.

Posted in Creation, Science | Leave a comment