Author Archives: Jon Garvey

Jon Garvey

About Jon Garvey

Training in medicine (which was my career), social psychology and theology. Interests in most things, but especially the science-faith interface. The rest of my time, though, is spent writing, playing and recording music.

More on the human limitations of science (especially regarding politics)

My attention was drawn to an important, but rather predictably neglected, 2004 article How science makes environmental controversies worse, by Daniel Sarewitz (Environmental Science & Policy 7 (2004) 385–403). It’s essential reading.

Posted in Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science | Leave a comment

The gospel and the world’s morality

A prayer letter I received yesterday had an introductory note that left me wondering. It was to the effect that only once someone is a Christian can their behaviour change, so Christians should not expect people to change before that work of the Holy Spirit. The writer questioned if the church gives the wrong message in this regard.

Posted in Theology | Leave a comment

Watch your language

Brett Weinstein was the bloke who ruffled progressive feathers by refusing to participate in a “non-white” day at Evergreen University a year or so ago, thus becoming revealed as a “Nazi”. He was recently interviewing the journalist Andy Ngo, beaten up a few days ago by Antifa thugs as per my last post (and therefore a fellow Nazi, of course, in woke eyes).

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Signs of weak nations

I’m not in any way primarily a political commentator, but in the “interesting” times in which we live, no thinking person can afford to ignore politics. In this case it was the brutal assault on a conservative (but Asian and gay) journalist Andy Ngo, who was filming an Antifa protest in Portland, Oregon – his home town. He was left with a brain haemorrhage, amongst other injuries, as well as having his equipment stolen.

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Meanwhile back in the real world…

This is really just a local nature report, so don’t expect a punchline. We’re promised a heatwave from Europe this weekend. The papers were, of course, immediately blaming it on climate change, but you may recall that Irving Berlin’s Heatwave appeared in 1933, during the dust bowl years, and the Martha and the Vandellas song of the same name came out in 1963, and depended on people picking up the allusion. In fact 1962-3 was, in Britain, notably cold and snowy, and it wasn’t nearly as hot a summer as those I remember from the fifties. It’s called “weather.”

Posted in Creation | Leave a comment

Scientists pay now, or must pay with interest later

Peter Ridd is an Australian geophysicist who has spent a lifetime studying the Great Barrier Reef, and recently won a court case against his dismissal from James Cook University, in which the judge was utterly scathing about the dirty tactics used to muzzle his academic freedom of speech and to discredit him as an individual.

Posted in Politics and sociology, Science | 9 Comments

“Just Nature” – clarify “Nature,” please.

Chasing up, for interest, references to the 1908 “Tunguska Event” (now most commonly thought to be a meteroric or cometary air-burst), I came across this recent piece in Physorg.

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Missing diagnostic categories

Abortions in the UK have gained the dubious honour of reaching the 200,000 per year level, as the BBC reports. When I was last working, a decade ago, they were hovering around the 180,000 mark.

Posted in Politics and sociology, Science | 2 Comments

God’s Good Earth not so controversial after all?

I wrote my book God’s Good Earth to counter the assumptions amongst both “conservative” Christians on the one hand, and secular and theistic evolutionists on the other, that the natural world is full of a morally problematic thing called “natural evil.”

Posted in Creation, Science, Theology of nature | Leave a comment

Climate Economic Apocalypse

I’ve been making bets with people that if the warnings about catastrophic global warming and sea level rise come true in the next twelve years, I’ll buy them a holiday in the Maldives. But in fact, though I fully expect the Maldives will still be a tropical paradise destination then, the aim of the UK government to make us unilaterally “carbon neutral” by 2050 will probably put such holidays beyond the reach of all but renewable energy billionaires in their private jets.

Posted in Politics and sociology, Science | 4 Comments