Category Archives: Science

Divination science

The furore in the UK over the “virtual” grades awarded to school students prevented from taking their A-levels, or their Scottish equivalents, because of lockdown is in full swing over here. Arguably, kids unjustly excluded from universities thereby are the lucky ones, given the way academia has become an indoctrination machine for identity politics and postmodernist superstition.

Posted in Politics and sociology, Science, Theology | 2 Comments

Music – more supernatural than mathematical

One for you music-lovers. Back in 2014 I did a couple of pieces on the musical concept of “swing,” to demonstrate how central human subjectivity is to important things, and in this instance, to the beauty of music. The links are here and here, though unfortunately most of the YouTube links are broken now. Great music is something generated by the human spirit, and is not simply tapping into mathematical concepts of rhythm, harmony and so on (though it builds on those).

Posted in Creation, Music, Science, Theology, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Cancelling Malthus

The Antiques Roadshow being forbidden to film normally because of the lockdown madness, the BEEB showed one of last year’s editions on Sunday, filmed at an historic Scottish Castle.

Posted in Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science | 5 Comments

The state execution of science

I finally got round to reading Scientocracy, (eds. Patrick J. Michaels and Terence Kealey). It’s only nine months old and already outdated by COVID-19 – or rather, thoroughly vindicated by the rapid descent into censorship of all but official government policy on what “the science” says, despite the clear and demonstrable failure of the predictive models most governments are still following.

Posted in History, Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science | 3 Comments

Environmental Fascism

In the current civil unrest, which has been blamed on an “institutional white racism” that led to a slavery which somehow persists nearly two centuries after its abolition, a number of people from Thomas Sowell to Baroness Caroline Cox have drawn attention both to a more complete history of slavery, and to the widespread existence of black slavery in Africa today.

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Doubling the fear

As the largest recession in British history begins to bite, the government has decided to spend a good chunk of its debt on campaigns (and more “draconian” legislation curtailing freedom of advertising, etc) on fighting obesity. The justification? That it has emerged that obese patients are perhaps twice as likely to die from Coronavirus infection as others.

Posted in Medicine, Politics and sociology, Science | 2 Comments

More on revolving-door exit strategies

Currently, two days before the wearing of face masks becomes compulsory in shops, the UK tally of COVID-19 deaths has dropped to only 65 daily. Where I live, in England’s west country, there have been no deaths at all for over a fortnight. Absolutely the right time to curtail liberty, then.

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Aposematism again

I just like the word, actually, but over the years the local caterpillars have given me several opportunities to take pretty pictures and think about their presumably defensive, or maybe just creative, colouration.

Posted in Creation, Science, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

A necessary weevil

I noticed one of these little chaps outside our house last week:

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This is the Night

Here’s another lockdown video for you , once more from a remix of an old recording of one of my songs. The views of The Vegetable Man have been encouraging, so the effort seems worthwhile. This one’s in darker vein than the last, and would probably be more effective when countries produce their first emergency budgets after lockdown and, in the UK particularly, reveal just how big a knife we’ve stuck in the economy. The Nobel Prizewinner Michael Levitt estimates that, whereas the usual averaged cost of a death (using “quality added life years,” or “QUALYs”), and therefore the “economic” health cost of saving it medically, is £40,000, the cost … Continue reading

Posted in History, Medicine, Music, Politics and sociology, Science, Theology | Leave a comment