Category Archives: Theology of nature

The population prediction bombs out

One of the earliest of the continuous stream of apocalyptic “scientific” prophecies that has culminated in 2030 and All That was Paul Ehrlich’s Population Bomb of 1968.

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Australopithecus saltationis

I found ID palaeontologist Günter Bechly’s article on the newly announced fossil hominid Australopithecus anamensis extremely thought provoking.

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Tangy snacks hang in there

On 18th of this month I reported the destruction by hungry badger of the wasp nest I have been watching develop here at the Camel’s Eyrie. Here was the damage:

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“Just Nature” – clarify “Nature,” please.

Chasing up, for interest, references to the 1908 “Tunguska Event” (now most commonly thought to be a meteroric or cometary air-burst), I came across this recent piece in Physorg.

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God’s Good Earth not so controversial after all?

I wrote my book God’s Good Earth to counter the assumptions amongst both “conservative” Christians on the one hand, and secular and theistic evolutionists on the other, that the natural world is full of a morally problematic thing called “natural evil.”

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Lest you be overwhelmed with excessive sorrow

Where do we start today? The film-makers have just stashed away the bonnets and top-hats, packed up their Victorian facades and swept the mud off the roads at Lyme Regis, 20 minutes from here, after taking over the town to film Mary Anning the Lesbian Fossil Hunter, aka Kate Winslet. My wife can take her morning coffee uninterrupted again.

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The tree in Berkeley’s square (no nightingale)

George Berkeley is most famous for his immaterialist view of reality, which is nicely, if incompletely, summed up in Monsignor Ronald Knox’s limerick:

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Predictability, reproducibility and determinism in chaos

On a Peaceful Science thread I promised Chris Falter that I’d respond to his argument that chaotic systems are instrinsically indeterminate. The context, of course, as the thread title shows (Every Birth is a Statistical Impossibilty) has to do with the possibility of determination of events by God, as well as by us.

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Abstraction and improbability

I’ve been dipping into George Berkeley’s philosophy recently, mainly because his mind-only view of reality resonates with some other thinkers whose ideas on the matter of matter have impressed me over the years, such as Arthur Eddington, Werner Heisenberg and William Dembski.

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Editing history

Back in early September 2017 I was writing a Hump piece  on Aquinas and the special creation of humanity. Providentially I stumbled on a YouTube video posted just the week before in which Tim Keller, Russell Moore and Ligon Duncan discuss their “non-negotiables” on creation.

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