Category Archives: Theology of nature

Death before the Fall

Three times in the last week, I’ve encountered YEC objections to old-earth thinking in general, and Genealogical Adam and Eve in particular, that stress the theological importance of the direct relationship between sin and death. One of these was in one of the few negative comments on Josh Swamidass’s YouTube interview (a good watch), one was from a scholar into whose correspondence I was copied, and one was from another Christian academic in a video on another topic.

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Progress on Heaven and Earth

Well, the indexes of The Generations of Heaven and Earth have now gone off to the publishers, which is my last literary input before the book comes out.

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You can’t exclude human influence from science

The title of this blog could refer to a number of things I’ve discussed here over the years. It could mean the fact that science is entirely a human activity, which could be summarised as asking the near-infinite realm of nature particular questions of human interest, to which it will return equally particular and incomplete answers. Or it could refer to the mysterious effects of mind on quantum events. But in fact in this post it’s about something else: providence.

Posted in Creation, Philosophy, Science, Theology of nature | 5 Comments

How the seal got his genes

The atlantic grey seal is the commoner of Britain’s two seal species: we have 40% of the world population. Not only is it a wonderful animal, but something of a conservation success story, the population having escalated after protective legislation in 1914 from just 500 to 120,000.

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Daytrippers, demons or dolphins?

Back in 2015 I confessed to an unhealthy obsession with UFOs in my early years. I regaled my friends with the exploits of George Adamski, and even persuaded my Latin teacher to have the class translate an allegedly mediaeval UFO report. Even now I still remember the Dewey Decimal code for the relevant section of our public library (629.1388).

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The population prediction bombs out

One of the earliest of the continuous stream of apocalyptic “scientific” prophecies that has culminated in 2030 and All That was Paul Ehrlich’s Population Bomb of 1968.

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Australopithecus saltationis

I found ID palaeontologist G√ľnter Bechly’s article on the newly announced fossil hominid Australopithecus anamensis extremely thought provoking.

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Tangy snacks hang in there

On 18th of this month I reported the destruction by hungry badger of the wasp nest I have been watching develop here at the Camel’s Eyrie. Here was the damage:

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“Just Nature” – clarify “Nature,” please.

Chasing up, for interest, references to the 1908 “Tunguska Event” (now most commonly thought to be a meteroric or cometary air-burst), I came across this recent piece in Physorg.

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God’s Good Earth not so controversial after all?

I wrote my book God’s Good Earth to counter the assumptions amongst both “conservative” Christians on the one hand, and secular and theistic evolutionists on the other, that the natural world is full of a morally problematic thing called “natural evil.”

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