Author Archives: Jon Garvey

Jon Garvey

About Jon Garvey

Training in medicine (which was my career), social psychology and theology. Interests in most things, but especially the science-faith interface. The rest of my time, though, is spent writing, playing and recording music.

Those magnificent beasts in their flying machines

Pretty rough weather here over the weekend. 40mph winds the night before last, together with torrential rain, all strong enough to break a thick branch on the oak tree immediately over our glass-house. Providentially, the two pieces sagged either side of the edifice, sparing all the glass.It also ended up resting on, but not breaking, our rotary clothes line, and sparing the hammock. It must have been that which woke me up thinking somebody was up early banging toys around. I’ll have to get the tree surgeons over to sort it out permanently, rather than clambering out along the bough with a handsaw myself and, no doubt, falling through the … Continue reading

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Listen to the NGOs (and documentary makers), not the scientists!

For listening to the politicians, see here. I’ve had an interest in “documentary fiction” for some years, and the subject even found its way into my book God’s Good Earth, primarily from the angle of “Nature porn” portraying God’s world anthropomorphically as a tragic drama. Unfortunately David Attenborough features heavily in my critique, firstly because he does it a lot, secondly because he is hugely influential through the technical quality of his stuff, and thirdly because as a degreed zoologist he ought to do better.

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Forgetful history

A correspondent with whom I’ve been discussing the Genesis Flood mentioned the interesting case of the Umm al Binni Lake in Iraq, which appears to be a recent meteoric impact crater, dated on the basis of the sedimentary history of the region to historic times. This would mean between 3000 and 2000 BCE, and it possibly corresponds to evidence in the region of widespread wildfires and floods from a likely airburst c2350BCE, called the Middle East Anomaly.

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Whacko!

Well, that was a thrill! I’ve just come back from walking the dog through the wood, and witnessed a bit of nature drama. So you may as well share it.

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Reparations for the Norman Conquest, etc

Whilst I was researching my “Empires” piece, I glanced at an article which mentioned a study that had shown that, on average, English families with surnames derived from the French language have more wealth than those with surnames of Anglo-Saxon origin.

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Tangy snacks hang in there

On 18th of this month I reported the destruction by hungry badger of the wasp nest I have been watching develop here at the Camel’s Eyrie. Here was the damage:

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Empires strike back

As an integral part of the current project within western society, and particularly academia, to construct a utopian world state free of -isms, -phobias and weather, one of the great bogeys is “imperialism.”

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Another word to avoid?

Sajid Javid, the Conservative Home Secretary, announced a report on “extremism” yesterday. According to the mainstream press, he used the opportunity to bemoan the rise of “far right populist movements” around the world, and in particular to condemn President Trump’s recent controversial remarks about a certain group of socialist Democrats that I am led to believe dictate to Congress over in the USA currently.

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Munchies with a tang

Last month I celebrated some of the wildife goings on here at the Camel’s Eyrie. Amongst them was this fine example of origami by a local band of common wasps:

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Listen to the politicians, not the scientists!

My green credentials aren’t too bad, I like to think, overall. My hectare of land is managed without chemicals largely as woodland and (rare) wild-flower meadow. My economical Suzuki does less than 6K miles a year, even though I live in the country with no public transport, and I haven’t even been on a plane since my daughter’s wedding in France in 2013. My book God’s Good Earth was endorsed by one of Britain’s leading scientific environmentalists as “a call to action.” Mr Chlorophyll, me.

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