Author Archives: Jon Garvey

About Jon Garvey

Training in medicine (which was my career), social psychology and theology. Interests in most things, but especially the science-faith interface. The rest of my time, though, is spent writing, playing and recording music.

Anomalies rule, OK?

We have a scattering of a pretty little plant called Centaury in our meadow – or we did have, until I mowed it at the end of last month.

Posted in Creation, Science | 1 Comment

The shape of things to come

47 years ago, I started my house jobs in Poole General Hospital, and discovered one of the most beautiful landscapes in the world in the Isle of Purbeck, to me previously only the subject of maps on coastal erosion in physical geography at school.

Posted in Politics and sociology | Leave a comment

Unsinkable models and the icebergs of data

There’s an interesting new paper here. It’s by four Irish authors (which has to be a good thing), two of whom declare their “conflicting interests” as signatories of the Great Barrington Declaration and (in one case) as a member of HART. However, in their declaration they note that the purpose of their involvement in the study was to understand the position of their opponents better.

Posted in Medicine, Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science | Leave a comment

9/11, identity cards, and vaccine passports

I guess I should say something about 9/11, other than what I’ve said previously about being at work that day and trying to find out where my daughter was on the last day of her New York stay (when she’d hinted she might visit the WTC as she was staying a block or two away); and about how to me it was a prophetic marker on the forthcoming judgement on Western nations, now come home to roost.

Posted in History, Politics and sociology | 2 Comments

How the incomprehensible becomes commonplace

I’m not sure why, but nowadays I don’t get many hits from Australian readers on The Hump. Only 2 visitors from NSW in the last month, and Australia at 36 hits comes well below Bangladesh, Vietnam, Romania and the Philippines. And that’s a shame because I’ve visited Australia and have many friends there. And they speak English, kind of. But nowadays it has become an alien land in serious ways.

Posted in Medicine, Politics and sociology | Leave a comment

Eating and drinking (viral) judgement

One of my enduring, and blackly amusing, memories of being a houseman was my occasional duty of administering radioactive isotope tracers in radiological examinations.

Posted in Medicine, Theology | Leave a comment

What is COVID? (Pontius Pilate)

The first article I wrote for the then-prestigious World Medicine, though it took a few months to get published in October 1981, was a tongue in cheek piece called Tonsillitis and the march of science.

Posted in Medicine, Politics and sociology, Science, Theology | 2 Comments

Another bit of the jigsaw

I’ve remarked before on the common pattern I’ve seen among those scientists and medics who have become sceptical of the whole COVID narrative. Sometimes such people have told their own story, and sometimes one has seen it emerge in real time on their blogs and videos over the months, as their thinking develops. But it goes a bit like this.

Posted in Medicine, Politics and sociology, Science | 3 Comments

How are the vaccines going nine months on?

Back at the beginning of December, when the world was young, I did a piece on the newly-authorised (albeit for emergency use) MRNA vaccines, and included a list of ten reasons one might consider delaying or refusing the vaccinations. I thought it might be interesting to see how things are panning out nine months later, using the same list for headings.

Posted in Medicine, Politics and sociology, Science | 4 Comments

A proper education

This is the last brood of the summer for the swallows that have returned to our stable for five or six summers now. They still look pretty fresh-faced and innocent, don’t they?

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