Category Archives: Medicine

Unsinkable models and the icebergs of data

There’s an interesting new paper here. It’s by four Irish authors (which has to be a good thing), two of whom declare their “conflicting interests” as signatories of the Great Barrington Declaration and (in one case) as a member of HART. However, in their declaration they note that the purpose of their involvement in the study was to understand the position of their opponents better.

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How the incomprehensible becomes commonplace

I’m not sure why, but nowadays I don’t get many hits from Australian readers on The Hump. Only 2 visitors from NSW in the last month, and Australia at 36 hits comes well below Bangladesh, Vietnam, Romania and the Philippines. And that’s a shame because I’ve visited Australia and have many friends there. And they speak English, kind of. But nowadays it has become an alien land in serious ways.

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Eating and drinking (viral) judgement

One of my enduring, and blackly amusing, memories of being a houseman was my occasional duty of administering radioactive isotope tracers in radiological examinations.

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What is COVID? (Pontius Pilate)

The first article I wrote for the then-prestigious World Medicine, though it took a few months to get published in October 1981, was a tongue in cheek piece called Tonsillitis and the march of science.

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Another bit of the jigsaw

I’ve remarked before on the common pattern I’ve seen among those scientists and medics who have become sceptical of the whole COVID narrative. Sometimes such people have told their own story, and sometimes one has seen it emerge in real time on their blogs and videos over the months, as their thinking develops. But it goes a bit like this.

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How are the vaccines going nine months on?

Back at the beginning of December, when the world was young, I did a piece on the newly-authorised (albeit for emergency use) MRNA vaccines, and included a list of ten reasons one might consider delaying or refusing the vaccinations. I thought it might be interesting to see how things are panning out nine months later, using the same list for headings.

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Human healthcare and its algorithmic counterfeit

One small part of the rich tapestry of current misery, in Britain at least, is the ongoing difficulty of getting to see your doctor since COVID closed all the GP practices. I haven’t heard that this is an issue beyond the jurisdiction of our Established Religion, the NHS, but maybe it’s been tried in other parts of the world too. Let me know in the comments.

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Loss of face on masks

Back in the mundane and familiar world of COVID totalitarianism, here’s a graphic that more or less sums up the real-world uselessness of face masks.

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Sheep with and without shepherds

I confess I’ve been troubled, for longer than the Coronavirus issue, at how Christians, including even my own local brethren, seem to have been amongst those most easily deceived by the lies surrounding us in the world. For in the Bible, Satan’s deception during the end times is represented as what distinguishes the elect from the reprobate (and not the bloody-minded from the law-abiding).

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UK risk of COVID death v. vaccine death August 2021

OK, I just have to increase the circulation of this graphic from the excellent statistician John Dee. It shows the risk of actually dying from COVID today in Britain, compared with the risk of dying from the vaccine. Brief explanation below the fold, but it’s very basic number crunching of official data and references are given.

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