Category Archives: Medicine

The Bat that Roared

Maybe you remember a cold-war era humorous novel by Leonard Wibberley, entitled The Mouse that Roared? It was subsequently made into a film starring Peter Sellers.

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Science goes Stalinist

A Prestigious cardiologist (Dr Peter McCullough) : a prestigious journal (Elsevier’s Current Problems in Cardiology): a worrying paper on rates of post-vaccination myocarditis. Peer review: check. Published online: check… then taken down “temporarily” and, a week later, “unpublished,” the only explanation to the lead author being that the publisher has the right to do so in the publishing contract. Full discussion here.

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I’m pro-vaccination, but…

Another day, and another excellent article points to the signs of developing problems with the COVID vaccination programme. At the same time, statistician John Dee provides an alarming presentation of ONS data showing how (factoring in obvious things like the number of tests) the positivity rate of PCR tests has escalated since mass vaccination was rolled out, even as you’d expect it to wane:

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Gambling with my life (with loaded dice)

I’m at an interesting age. COVID’s lethality, when you’re 69, is beginning to be significant enough at around 1% to be worth considering, and that rate is beginning to increase rapidly into the 70s, which is also significant as the virus becomes endemic. And that’s why I and Mrs G made the calculus that the short terms risks of vaccination seemed low enough to get double-jabbed back in May.

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What really happened AFTER Wuhan?

I’ve just finished Sharri Markson’s excellent and thorough book on the lab leak from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, whose reality I believe she establishes beyond reasonable doubt through testimonies from whistleblowers at the lab to Mike Pompeo, Secretary of State under the last US president, as well as through examining the science of SARS-CoV-2 itself.

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Spy v spy v spy

Tom Lehrer used to introduce his song about nuclear tests by informing audiences he had once worked at the Los Alamos testing site. “I had a job there as a spy.” When the people laughed, he added they ought to know that everyone working there had been a spy of one persuasion or another. The whole COVID thing is rapidly beginning to look rather like that, so here’s an update on the current evidence, as a kind of DIY conspiracy construction kit. In all seriousness, looking at the various established motives might help, in Sherlock Holmes fashion, to “exclude the impossible” and come closer to the truth. Or it might … Continue reading

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The facts behind the stats

A very short post today, simply giving this link to an important report on the admission data for a large UK NHS hospital trust. “John Dee,” a retired NHS statistician, does an in-depth analysis of the data on admissions, morbidity and deaths relating to COVID-19, and finds that what the publicly available statistics describe bears little relationship to reality. Given the “lockstep” phenomenon see across the world regarding COVID, I have little doubt simnilar things are true for non-British readers.

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Policy dictates science, actually

We’ve got used to governments and their political scientific appointees claiming to be the sole custodians of The Science which they are so assiduously following in all kinds of strange directions. Dr Fauci infamously said that to disagree with him is to disagree with Science. And we’ve also come to understand that there is widespread opposition to this official views from highly accredited scientists and doctors, who have been comprehensively censored, ridiculed and penalised in ways that do no credit to the “mainstream view.” The intellectual basis of this polarisation is largely explained in this article. But the last week has taken a more remarkable turn, in the sidelining of … Continue reading

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Unsinkable models and the icebergs of data

There’s an interesting new paper here. It’s by four Irish authors (which has to be a good thing), two of whom declare their “conflicting interests” as signatories of the Great Barrington Declaration and (in one case) as a member of HART. However, in their declaration they note that the purpose of their involvement in the study was to understand the position of their opponents better.

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How the incomprehensible becomes commonplace

I’m not sure why, but nowadays I don’t get many hits from Australian readers on The Hump. Only 2 visitors from NSW in the last month, and Australia at 36 hits comes well below Bangladesh, Vietnam, Romania and the Philippines. And that’s a shame because I’ve visited Australia and have many friends there. And they speak English, kind of. But nowadays it has become an alien land in serious ways.

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