Category Archives: Philosophy

How climate alarmism becomes a woke cause

When I wrote Seeing through Smoke I rather surprised myself, and annoyed some otherwise supportive readers, by bracketing the climate change issue together with the propaganda campaign for issues of gender and sexuality, with which it has no obvious links.

Posted in Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science, Theology | 2 Comments

Big data and big experience

If you’re interested in the value and suppression of ivermectin in the treatment and prevention of COVID infection (and in the treatment of long COVID and long-post-vaccine syndromes), there’s an excellent, and extremely long, long-form discussion here between Pierre Kory and Brett Weinstein.

Posted in Medicine, Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science | 4 Comments

Nudge, nudge, wink, wink

I have developed another reason to be suspicious of the promised “freedom” supposedly being unrolled in stages upon Britain’s lockdown. This arose from inadvertently catching a part of Boris Johnson’s announcement of next week’s partial changes, which I usually try to avoid. It was something about being able to hug people as long as they’re the people you’ve been hugging already for months… your children, for example.

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Evolutionary theology

An essay of mine has just been published at Sapientia as part of a symposium in response to John Schneider’s Animal Suffering and the Darwinian Problem of Evil, overseen by Kevin Vanhoozer.

Posted in Creation, History, Philosophy, Science, Theology of nature | Leave a comment

Virtue, virtue everywhere…

Last month the now mandatory alumni magazine arrived from my wife’s old college. The usual requests for money were inside, but the cover sported a photo of an athletic-looking black chap in rugby strip standing in front of the familiar architecture.

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A sense of place

I’ve just read two books to lift the heart above the media’s COVID monomania, albeit it in a bittersweet way. The second was Meadowland: the Private Life of an English Field, by John Lewis-Strempel, a birthday gift from my daughter. It traces the year in the life of a hay-meadow in Herefordshire as observed by its owner, which resonates with me because I own a hay-meadow in Devon.

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When public truth becomes subjective

In my last post I wrote about the subjectivisation of truth in the progressive programme. But it would be a mistake to think this is restricted to specific examples like race and gender, because the postmodern element of progressivism extends it to the whole of life. It is all truth that becomes subjectivised to a preferred narrative, not just particular instances. Needless to say, this has profound implications.

Posted in History, Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Theology | 2 Comments

Paranoia and Patriarchy

Paranoia is a pretty distressing symptom in its common setting of schizophrenia. My in-laws once went for a house viewing, only to find the place full of scrap metal structures intended to prevent US satellites spying on the owner. But it can occasionally be potentially lethal as well.

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Those best placed to know

Bret Weinstein, in discussion with Heather Heying, makes some interesting observations on why “scientific consensus” is not always the virtuous thing it seems. His topical example is the increasing evidence that SARS-CoV-2 was accidentally released from the virology laboratory in Wuhan, as the evidence for the “wet market” hypothesis becomes less and less persuasive.

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Why lockdown kills everybody

I’m pretty sure a new word is soon going to become part of the English language: “zoomed-out.” I keep hearing the concept, if not always the phrase, used by people who are, ostensibly, doing reasonably well under lockdown. Whether it’s our own student pastor, doing all his church and college work on a screen, or historian Neil Oliver comparing dreary lockdown life with the buzz he felt from a live audience on a book tour before all this, or even my old school-fellow J. J. Burnel commenting ruefully on trying to compose a new Stranglers album via Zoom (having sadly lost his friend and keyboard player, Dave Greenfield, to COVID … Continue reading

Posted in Medicine, Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science, Theology | 1 Comment