Category Archives: Philosophy

Unsinkable models and the icebergs of data

There’s an interesting new paper here. It’s by four Irish authors (which has to be a good thing), two of whom declare their “conflicting interests” as signatories of the Great Barrington Declaration and (in one case) as a member of HART. However, in their declaration they note that the purpose of their involvement in the study was to understand the position of their opponents better.

Posted in Medicine, Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science | Leave a comment

Noble lies are still lies

A US poll on COVID vaccination refusers gives the interesting result that the proportion of refusers is high in the least-educated classes, but highest amongst those at PhD level. It is, of course, rather tempting to identify the lower refusal rate amongst the moderately educated with what some would call “midwits,” but the real significance, it seems to me, is how those educated and interested enough to research the issue are discovering something suspicious. That seems to accord with experience of many I’ve encountered here on The Hump and elsewhere.

Posted in Philosophy, Politics and sociology | 2 Comments

Scurvy knaves as the products of worldviews

In my last post I finished off by speculating whether the ambitions of technocrats like Klaus Schwab for a new world order, dangerously near to fulfilment because of the apathy of the majority, might in part be based on the materialist worldview which regards free-will as an illusion.

Posted in Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science, Theology of nature | Leave a comment

How climate alarmism becomes a woke cause

When I wrote Seeing through Smoke I rather surprised myself, and annoyed some otherwise supportive readers, by bracketing the climate change issue together with the propaganda campaign for issues of gender and sexuality, with which it has no obvious links.

Posted in Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science, Theology | 2 Comments

Big data and big experience

If you’re interested in the value and suppression of ivermectin in the treatment and prevention of COVID infection (and in the treatment of long COVID and long-post-vaccine syndromes), there’s an excellent, and extremely long, long-form discussion here between Pierre Kory and Brett Weinstein.

Posted in Medicine, Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science | 4 Comments

Nudge, nudge, wink, wink

I have developed another reason to be suspicious of the promised “freedom” supposedly being unrolled in stages upon Britain’s lockdown. This arose from inadvertently catching a part of Boris Johnson’s announcement of next week’s partial changes, which I usually try to avoid. It was something about being able to hug people as long as they’re the people you’ve been hugging already for months… your children, for example.

Posted in Medicine, Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science | Leave a comment

Evolutionary theology

An essay of mine has just been published at Sapientia as part of a symposium in response to John Schneider’s Animal Suffering and the Darwinian Problem of Evil, overseen by Kevin Vanhoozer.

Posted in Creation, History, Philosophy, Science, Theology of nature | Leave a comment

Virtue, virtue everywhere…

Last month the now mandatory alumni magazine arrived from my wife’s old college. The usual requests for money were inside, but the cover sported a photo of an athletic-looking black chap in rugby strip standing in front of the familiar architecture.

Posted in Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Theology | Leave a comment

A sense of place

I’ve just read two books to lift the heart above the media’s COVID monomania, albeit it in a bittersweet way. The second was Meadowland: the Private Life of an English Field, by John Lewis-Strempel, a birthday gift from my daughter. It traces the year in the life of a hay-meadow in Herefordshire as observed by its owner, which resonates with me because I own a hay-meadow in Devon.

Posted in History, Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science, Theology | Leave a comment

When public truth becomes subjective

In my last post I wrote about the subjectivisation of truth in the progressive programme. But it would be a mistake to think this is restricted to specific examples like race and gender, because the postmodern element of progressivism extends it to the whole of life. It is all truth that becomes subjectivised to a preferred narrative, not just particular instances. Needless to say, this has profound implications.

Posted in History, Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Theology | 2 Comments