Category Archives: Science

Not the Language of God

And whilst in accusatory mode… As a former follower of the theistic evolution outfit BioLogos for a decade, and indeed having written an article for it long ago, I have previously expressed some misgivings about the apparent role of founder Francis Collins in the gain-of-function studies at Wuhan, and their subsequent cover up by major US players like Peter Daszak and Anthony Fauci. Since then the “mainstream” view has shifted towards a lab leak being more likely than not, making Collins’s involvement even more of an issue.

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Fact-free moral compass is immoral

The Book of Proverbs (18:17) says, “In a lawsuit the first to speak seems right, until someone comes forward and cross-examines.” Imagine how absurd it would be (though in history all too common) for an accuser to say, “That man murdered my baby!” and for the jury to go away to decide if murdering babies is wrong, and if so that the man must be hanged.” But nowadays church leaders seem really good at doing just that.

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Divided COVID falls… maybe

Here’s an excellent long-form presentation by Dr Shankara Chetty, a South African doctor who has successfully treated over 7,000 patients with COVID, which is on Bitchute (and no prizes for guessing why it’s there and not on You-Tube!).

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High Omicron deaths are inevitable but false

Only in the last day or two have COVID test positivity rates started to exceed the rise in testing. The increased testing has already therefore grossly exaggerated Omicron’s effect, and will inevitably do so more as testing mania escalates. But the emphasis on “cases” by the Whittys of this world, the media and most of the public shows that even this elementary bias is not understood, even two years into COVID. Science truly died – together with public understanding – in 2020.

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A Plague Upon Our House

This is the title of Scott Atlas’s new book. But which House? The US White House or the UK House of Commons? The book is about the former, of course, but let’s start with the other.

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The evils of the latest COVID measures cross a line

It seems that every Christmas letter I get speaks of these “strange/confusing/uncertain times” before telling me how the family managed to have a get together between lockdowns, or not. But all confusion and uncertainty is quickly dispelled when one understands that the times are simply evil. Once you appreciate that, the nature of your round robins probably changes. With the latest restrictions, the UK government has crossed a line from incompetence, ineffectualness and harmfulness to pure evil. Which is interesting since a majority support them unthinkingly, even in the churches.

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The mysterious origin of Omicron

As Boris Johnson’s new baby conveniently arrives so he can take time off from defending his accumulating scandals to be with his family, despite the “national emergency” requiring Plan B, our government remains in full totalitarian mode. As the Mail headline says: “Ministers draw up plans to bring back masks in ALL indoor spaces, scanning at pubs and restaurants and vaccine passports for more venues in New Year.” And this, as I wrote yesterday, whilst nothing actually bad is happening due to COVID. The WHO has yet to report a single death from the Omicron variant.

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Press button B

Another day, another doom and gloom TV conference and another set of COVID restrictions. The press today is full of that news, of “Partygate,” and of the connection between them. There is much talk in the news of the restrictions being another Boris Johnson “Dead Cat” strategy to get his own and his government’s cynical disregard of the devastating and useless regulations, which they themselves imposed on the rest of us last Christmas, off the hook.

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Rules are there to break us

We had an excellent pub lunch on our daughter’s birthday yesterday. A lovely warm and cosy thatched village hostelry, with a log fire. It was obviously very popular because every table was full. We spent a couple of hours there over an excellent meal and their home-brewed bitter. And the only masks in sight were on a few of the newcomers sporting their cosmetically-compliant face-rags as they came through the deserted lobby to the sparsely-occupied bar, before being ushered to their convivially-packed tables and removing the masks.

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The evolution of British primary health care

Back in the days of Richard Baxter, George Herbert or John Wesley, medical care was part of the remit of the church minister. Whilst physicians balanced the humours of the rich in cities, out in the sticks the poor could seldom afford their fees, and the pastor, as the most educated member of the community, made it his business to know some herbal cures and folk remedies. How effective they were – other than by demonstrating compassion, not to be denigrated in these days when the suffering are left to die alone – is hard to say, but then the same is true of the professional bleeders and purgers of … Continue reading

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