Nobel Prize pseudoscience v Classics orthodoxy

Returning to my long thread on science in the media over at Peaceful Science, at one stage the accusations of irrational climate denialism were expressed, by a classics graduate, no less, thus:

This is the language of the science denialist. Which anti-science cause will you champion next, chiropractic and homeopathy? Continue reading

Posted in Creation, Philosophy, Politics and sociology, Science | 5 Comments

Welcome back M. Macron

I had reason to comment on the number of apparent French vistors The Hump was receiving, back in March. I invited any French readers to comment here, but it soon became clear why none ever did. Continue reading

Posted in Politics and sociology | 3 Comments

Models of probity

There is still no substantive response to the evidence I gave at Peaceful Science for the misrepresentation of walrus deaths in a David Attenborough film. But “T_aquaticus” has taken it upon himself to apply the “climate denialist” insinuations of people on the thread (I have not denied climate change there), and to sigh, in that exasperated tone that scientistic types always use when they think they’re dealing with people who read as little as they do. He writes: “I’m guessing that no amount of information is going to budge you?” Continue reading

Posted in Politics and sociology, Science | 2 Comments

Big oil = big chums!

My thread on Peaceful Science, “Media Science” has gone, so far, to over 400 comments, but despite the stern admonitions from the skeptical scientist types there to “follow the data, not the propaganda,” none of them has even attempted to address the subject of the post, which was the data about the misinformation about walrus deaths being due to climate change on a David Attenborough documentary. Continue reading

Posted in History, Politics and sociology, Science | 6 Comments

Simplifying good government

When I was a medical student, I got to meet the wife of one of my then-favourite Sci-Fi writers, James Blish, after she’d had a minor accident on a London bus. This was around the time of the author’s declining health, so it must have been a particularly stressful time for Mrs Blish. Continue reading

Posted in History, Politics and sociology, Science | 2 Comments

Short memory and easy distraction

As I mentioned in a previous post, in a Radio Times article puffing the recent David Attenborough Doom Documentary on climate, he drew attention to the deforestation of the Philippines and Borneo. These are indeed serious problems, though not upon consideration any result whatsoever of climate change. Rather they result from various economic and social factors, including the high premium placed on timber for biomass as a result of misguided measures taken to prevent climate change . Continue reading

Posted in Creation, History, Politics and sociology, Science | Leave a comment

If governments followed science

Let me first return to Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis, which I’ve mentioned a couple of times before, and especially here (hat-tip to Clinton Ohlers’s work), since it can be used to explore many aspects of modern science, especially in relation to faith. Continue reading

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Rebellion Extinction

The spontaneous grass-roots occupation of central London last week, in order to force the government to implement drastic climate-change measures by democratic … civil disobedience, immediately reminded me of the equally spontaneous demonstrations of my youth that turned out, in due course, to be orchestrated by highly motivated societal manipulators, with highly ideological agendas. Continue reading

Posted in Politics and sociology, Science | 2 Comments

Learning reality

Our four year old granddaughter had a slight melt-down on Wednesday. She’d been with us for nearly the whole week, and for breakfast enjoyed all kinds of healthy and less healthy cerials. However, just before the relevant meal that morning she conversationally mentioned that the last time she was here, she’d had breakfast that went “pop.” This was rapidly identified as Rice Crispies. Continue reading

Posted in Politics and sociology, Science | 2 Comments

Making nature tell our stories

An article in the BBC magazine Radio Times, by David Butler, is an interview with Sir David Attenborough. Butler raises the question about why series like Blue Planet II divert viewers from the wonders of nature by the oft-repeated message about impending ecological disaster and, particularly, climate change. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 6 Comments